Wart removal products

The next step for many people, who have been unable to remove the wart with home remedies, is to visit a pharmacy. Most remedies sold on the high street contain salicylic acid, which can be found in many forms such as in gels, creams, plasters or pads. Salicylic acid softens and dissolves the wart and is a popular choice of wart remedy.

Warts and Verrucas can be removed with over-the-counter treatments for warts and verrucas. These products burn the top layer of affected skin. Besides gels, creams, ointments, cold sprays are available as cryo therapy.

 

Cream                                                                                                               

There are various ways that can cut out or burn warts. Creams or ointments are an option. However, they are usually only done by specialists if other treatments have failed. Treatment may not be available on the NHS to treat warts and verrucas unless there are complications or they are very severe. Creams to treat warts try to kill the virus (virucidal creams) or try stop the skin cells from multiplying. A doctor who treats warts may prescribes cream, which is normally used for skin cancers.

The following nontraditional treatments have worked for some people, but are no evidence that they are better than salicylic acid and cryotherapy:

  • This is available as an ointment you apply to the wart or as a pill. The oral form may be particularly effective in people with a zinc deficiency.
  • Silver nitrate. This is available as a solution or ointment, which you apply to the wart.

 

Plasters 

The active ingredient of wart plasters in most of these treatments is salicylic acid. In two-thirds of cases, research has shown that warts clear up within 12 weeks of treatment with salicylic acid.

Salicylic acid and other wart treatments also destroy healthy skin, so it is important to protect your skin before applying the treatment. Use petroleum jelly or a corn plaster to cover your skin around the wart.

Soak the wart in water for about five minutes, and then follow the instructions on the packet to apply the medication. Some GP’s recommend putting a plaster on the wart after you have applied the medication.

 

Home remedies

Home remedies are for many people the first step in trying to remove a wart. Some of these treatments [link naar 18] can be successful, but they usually take longer to work or may not work at all. One very popular home remedy is apple cider vinegar, as it is 

probably one of the most effective. Applying apple cider vinegar to the wart will, over time, cause it to turn black and fall off. A list of home remedies can be found on this page.

There is a limited amount of scientific evidence to support the use of Duct Tape in the treatment of warts and verrucas. A suitable size piece of duct tape is placed over the wart or verruca for around 6 days. If the tape should fall off, simply replace it with a fresh piece. Following the 6th day of treatment, immerse the wart or verruca in water. Repeat the process, ensuring around 2 months of continual treatment.

Gel

Many over-the-counter (OTC) treatments, such as creams, gels, paints and medicated plasters, are available from pharmacies. The active ingredient in most of these treatments is salicylic acid. In two-thirds of cases, research has shown that warts clear up within 12 weeks of treatment with salicylic acid Salicylic acid and other wart treatments also destroy healthy skin, so it is important to protect your skin before applying the treatment. Use petroleum jelly or a corn plaster to cover your skin around the wart.

Soak the wart in water for about five minutes, and then follow the instructions on the packet to apply the medication. Some GP’s recommend putting a plaster on the wart after you have applied the medication.

Rub the dead tissue off the wart once a week, using a pumice stone or emery board (do not share these with anyone else). You may need to apply the treatment daily for up to 12 weeks, or longer. Stop the treatment if your skin becomes sore. For warts on your face, avoid treatments containing salicylic acid and seek your GP’s advice about treatment.

If you have poor circulation (for example, if you have a condition such as diabetes or peripheral vascular disease) you should seek your GP’s advice before using over-the-counter treatments containing salicylic acid. This is because there is an increased risk of damage to your skin, nerves and tendons.